Sunday, 5 February 2017

PussyHats Galore


Please excuse my silence over the past week. With so many crazy things happening in the world right now, I was not in the mood for blogging even though I do have things to tell you about. I am a little late now in showing you my tiny bit of craftivism, but I am sure it will still be needed in the future.

I am sure you heard about the Women's March on Washington that took place the day after the US president's inauguration. I hear it was the largest march of its kind in history and it did not confine itself to Washington or even the US. There were marches all over the world, even here in the UK. The closest one to me was in London. While I didn't march personally, I knew this was big and important. So I decided to show my solidarity with these women (and men) who marched that day, picked pink yarn from my stash and started knitting my own PussyHat as they marched and I followed them on Twitter and the news.


PussyHats are a symbol of resistance, of rights for women. They are a reaction to Trump's policies and his disgusting claim that if you're famous, you can "grab them by the pussy" and they'll let you, "you can do anything." You will have seen images of the march and the sea of pink PussyHats. It was truly a sight to behold.

So on that day I knitted from late morning till evening, but had to stop shortly before I could finish the final bit of ribbing. When I finally sewed the seams and wove in the ends, it was too late for the march, of course, but that didn't stop me from wearing the hat at work the following week. 

It was a great success with colleagues who are  involved in politics and follow current developments both at home and abroad. My Spanish colleague took this photo of me to share with her friends.

Interestingly, this hat pattern has now been adapted for a different cause altogether, though one closer to home. Some crafty EU-nationals living in the UK are preparing to protest against the treatment of us as bargaining chips in this Brexit... fiasco, for lack of a better word. They plan to wear a blue hat with yellow stars that reflects the EU flag. I think that is a great idea! (You can also find a classic beanie knitting pattern to go with the cause here.)

If you are an EU-national in the UK, by the way, and want to stay up-to-date with developments as they pertain to our status here post-Brexit, feel free to join the3million on Facebook or follow them on Twitter. We cannot rely on politicians doing the right thing. We must make sure we are heard.

And this is probably as political a post as I am ever going to write on this blog. At least I hope there won't be a need for any more.

2 comments:

  1. That's a great version of the hat! It's a good photo of you as well :-).

    It's funny -- the pussy hats barely feel political to me, because it's just so flaming obvious a thing to protest!

    I do find it interesting that after several years away from the political stage, handmade hats are such loud and ubiquitous symbols of resistance. You're right -- the pussy hats in the Women's March were truly a sight to behold. Sewn ones, crocheted ones, knitted ones, ones that were finished in transit to the gathering site and pulled onto a head the moment the last end was finished off. So, so many of them.

    If it's all right to leave a link, I thought this article from the Globe & Mail (one of Canada's oldest newspapers) was a good overview of the pussy hat's place in history: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/hats-off-to-the-women-the-knitted-pink-headpieces-help-make-history/article33696505/

    Thank you for mentioning the EU hats. I hadn't heard about those. I shall have to go and take a look!

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    1. Thank you for commenting, Katherine, and for the article. This was a very interesting read.

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